Schulman Grove and Methuselah Grove Loop

Inyo County, California

5.0/5
based on 1 reviews

Details

Distance

5.14 miles

Elevation Gain

1070 ft

Route Type

Loop

Description

Added by Sarah Horn

The Schulman Grove and Methuselah Grove Loop in the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest highlights the world's oldest living tree (non-clonal), a 4,847 year-old Bistlecone Pine called Methuselah.

The Schulman Grove and Methuselah Grove Loop in the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, located in the White Mountains, is where the 4,847-year-old Methuselah tree grows, the oldest living non-clonal organism in the world. If you're going to make hiking the Methuselah Grove more than a day trip and get in some more touring of the White Mountains, you can stay at the Grandview Campground. The campground is free, with a suggested $5 donation, for your pick from big, shaded spots with fire pits and a picnic table.

To get there, from Big Pine take 168 northeast up into the Whites. From the 168 you'll take a left onto White Mountain Road and drive up 5.5 miles to the campground. The visitors center in Big Pines is a good place to stop and fill up on water, which is actually really good tasting.

The Methuselah Grove is specifically located in the Schulman Grove, which is a few miles up the road past the campground. The area is generally open from mid-May through the end of November, weather permitting. You'll park at the Schulman Grove Visitors Center and start the 5 mile loop hike from there. On the hike you'll go through the entire Schulman Grove, including the Methuselah Grove where the Methuselah tree is located (not labeled of course).

The Schulman Grove is named after Edmund Schulman, the researcher who discovered the Methuselah.

If there's still snow, the road leading all the way up to the visitors center isn't plowed. So, you'll just park about a mile down from the visitors center and walk up on the road. Snow shoes are a good idea if the snow is fresh. There's a fantastic viewpoint on the road leading up to visitors center from the campground, don't pass on hiking the 100 yards or so to the lookout.

The Bristlecone Pines become more gnarled and hardened as they age. The hardening, caused by resin, is what enables them, in part, to live so long as it protects them from disease. The species are also incredibly drought resistant.

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Features

Camping
Photography
Hiking
Bathrooms
Family Friendly
Forest
Groups
Picnic Area
Romantic
Scenic
Wildlife

Schulman Grove and Methuselah Grove Loop Reviews

Love these beautiful old trees, they’re living artwork. The trail itself isn’t too strenuous but realize you’re at 9,000’+ so everything seems a bit more taxing. There’s a beautiful seasonal visitor center and a shorter Discovery Loop if you’re not up for the longer loop. Excellent views across the valley from White Mountain Road on the way up from 168 as well. Well worth a visit for all ages.

Leave No Trace

Always practice Leave No Trace ethics on your adventures and follow local regulations. Please explore responsibly!

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