• Activities:

    Chillin, Camping, Backpacking, Hiking

  • Skill Level:

    Intermediate

  • Season:

    Year Round

  • Trail Type:

    Out-and-Back

  • RT Distance:

    3.6 Miles

Beach
Scenic

Spend a night just above the coast of Pt. Reyes, and take a very short 200 meter hike down to the beach and tide pools.

This campground is the closest you can get to staying overnight on Pt. Reyes coastline if you're backpacking in. Once you get there, enjoy the view!

The easiest way to get to the camp is from the slightly uphill hike along the Laguna Trail and the Firelane Trail. The trailhead for the Laguna Trail is just past the hostel.

Keep in mind that the Coast Trail does have issues during the rainy months, so keep an eye out for closures if trails become flooded.

Pack List

  • Camping Permit from the Bear Valley Visitor Center
  • Campsite Reservation
  • Backpack
  • Tent
  • Sleeping Bag
  • Food
  • Water
  • Lightweight layers due to ocean fog
  • Trekking Poles (optional)
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Reviews

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We saw a whale! The ones in the “valley” have less privacy and views, but still great. Note that this isn't a rugged backpacking trip but any stretch of the imagination. That being said, is great for beginners and anyone looking for an easy, local trip along the coast!

3 months ago
3 months ago

this is an amazing place to camp and the views at sunset are just breathtaking.

10 months ago
10 months ago

Pt Reyes does not allow dogs (leashed or not) on any of the trails. Only limited public areas are open to leashed dogs. I would also mark the difficulty level as 'Beginner'. As other reviewers have indicated, there are many amenities. Only light packing (basically a tent).

12 months ago
12 months ago

If so, this is a great hike to get a feel for backpacking without needing to worry about some of the most common reasons people are afraid to try backpacking. The Coast Camp has both vault toilets and running water, so no water filtering is necessary. The Coast Camp is very close to the trailhead so don't expect privacy and in fact, we had a larger group of college students in one of the group sites that were up quite late having fun. They weren't annoying but just prepare for more of a campground experience once you get to the camp as opposed to the normal backpacking experience. One of the other great things about this camp is its proximity to the beach and once on the beach you can hike far enough along the beach to find some solitude if that's what you are looking for. Overall a great year-round backpacking option for those who are just getting into it or for something to do during the shoulder seasons.

over 1 year ago
over 1 year ago

Really wonderful spot. I try to camp at Coast Camp 2x a year if I can! I prefer going in the springtime though because of all the wild iris blooming. I have camped at several Point Reyes campgrounds, but Coast is my favorite, and favorite place to bring first-timers that aren't quite ready to hike in further than 6 miles or so. The trail from the hostel is quite flat and is primed for bike camping, and is 3 miles from where you have parked. The first half is shaded through wooded/boggy areas (Yo, mosquitos), and then the second half is perfect Pacific views. The campground itself has water spigots, grills and picnic tables in each site, and bathrooms. It's also a very short walk down to the beach. All of the beauty of Wildcat Camp, but a much quicker trek. The group campsites have no privacy, but the single sites have a lot of privacy. I'm partial to spot 7 and 3, personally. 7 is VERY private and pretty far from the bathroom (except you frequently have hikers think that the camp trail goes somewhere--it doesn't. It goes to site 7), but 3 has great ocean views. Definitely bring steel wool--the mice are relentless and the people there before you maybe didn't have any, either. Make sure ALL food and anything that may even be slightly odorous is in the food locker. I had a raccoon take a nibble through my tent. Once there, I love going on longer hikes, unburdened. There is also great tidepooling nearby. I last was there in April, and brought someone with me that had shattered her ankle a year and a half prior. She did amazingly! Can't recommend this place enough.

over 1 year ago
over 1 year ago

Josiah Roe Admin

The world is big and I want to have a good look at it before it gets dark. - John Muir

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