• Activities:

    Camping, Photography, Backpacking, Hiking

  • Skill Level:

    Beginner

  • Season:

    Year Round

  • Trail Type:

    Out-and-Back

  • RT Distance:

    8 Miles

Scenic

Jaw dropping views greet hikers around every twist and turn through the canyon. This is a must do if camping at Death Valley.

The trail head is north of Furnace Creek at the Titus Canyon parking lot which is clearly marked on any park map. On a busy weekend cars are lined up along the road leading to the parking lot which has a restroom. Note that there is no water source here. To begin the hike in, take the trail on the left of the restroom.

The hike leads you around cliffs offering spectacular views of the entirety of Death Valley. The trail then enters the canyon through 3 miles of beautiful rock formations. There is little to no elevation change and it is a fairly easy hike. After 3 miles, you will reach a dry fall which is seen in the second picture above. To continue beyond the fall to the camp, you must take a more complicated route. About 100 yards before the dry fall, there is a path that you can climb up on the right if facing the dry fall. This path is pictured in the last photo above and begins above the small pile of rocks. It is obviously not clearly marked in any way. However, once you are able to climb up the path, there is a clear trail leading beyond the dry fall towards camp. Note: this climb is not simple with a full pack and may require passing up packs or investigating alternate routes.

Hiking one more mile in leads you though a series of slot canyons and more spectacular views to a clearly marked campsite on your right, as pictured above in the fifth picture. The campsite is also equipped with a fire pit but the use of a campfire is not allowed in the back country in Death Valley.

Pack List

  • Backcountry permit obtained at any ranger station (Stovepipe Wells station or Furnace Creek may be the best places to obtain this permit)
  • Park entrance fee: $20
  • Sufficient water (there is no water source at either the trail head or within the canyon at any point. Opportunities to fill water are at Stovepipe Wells or Furnace Creek)
  • Backpack
  • Camping supplies
  • Camera
Read More

Please respect the places you find on The Outbound.

Always practice Leave No Trace ethics on your adventures. Be aware of local regulations and don't damage these amazing places for the sake of a photograph. Learn More

Community Photos

+ Add Photos

Reviews

Overall rating:  Rate this Adventure

Leave a Review

Have you done this adventure? Leave a review!

Andrew Conway

Oregon native paying rent in San Francisco :D

Are we missing something? Suggest an edit

Nearby Adventures

Hike the Sugar Bowl Loop in Kings Canyon NP

Tulare County, California

First and foremost, to get to this trailhead you need to drive down a 2-mile, one lane dirt road that is quite steep.

6 Saves

Hike to Ehukai Pillbox

59178 Ke Nui Road, Hawaii

This hike starts directly across from Banzai Pipeline, the famous barreling wave at Ehukai Beach.

7 Saves

Winter Hike to Calypso Cascades

1046 County Highway 115, Colorado

While most people go snowshoeing near the Bear Lake or Glacier Gorge area in RMNP, Wild Basin is a much less trafficked option.

5 Saves