Hike the Appalachian Trail to Anthony's Nose

Hike the Appalachian Trail to Anthony's Nose

Bear Mountain Inn Parking Lot

Distance

2 Miles

Elevation Gain

790 Feet

Activities

Photography, Hiking

Skill

Beginner

Season

Spring, Summer, Autumn

Type

Out-and-Back

Added by

Shaun O'Neill

Dog Friendly
Family Friendly
Scenic

Hike a stretch of the Appalachian Trail with panoramic views of the Hudson River and Bear Mountain. 

Parking for the trail runs along both sides of 9D right up until the Bear Mountain Bridge. It can be busy on the weekends so just make sure you're as far off the road as you can and be especially careful unloading kids and dogs. The trailhead is located at approximately 41.322571, -73.975949 and has an information board, though it's hit or miss if there is a stack of maps so best to be prepared and bring your own.

The white trail takes you half a mile up a series of stone stair cases and represents almost all of the elevation gain you'll make on the hike. If while climbing these stairs you suddenly feel the urge to keep hiking for hours, days, even weeks fear not, you're not going through dehydration delusions. You're just making your way on the Appalachian Trail, one of the most famous in the US, and sharing it with people who start their trek in Georgia and end months later in Maine. If you happen to come across one of them, pick their brain and take in their stories because they're going to be fantastic.

After the stairs the white trail will intersect with the blue, on which you'll take a right. The trail is well marked but it's unnecessary, it is the size of a service road and quite well worn. There will be plenty of little foot paths that shoot off to the right towards daylight through the trees that you're welcome to explore, but none of them compare to the outlook you'll hit at almost exactly one mile. The path will open through the trees to open rock face, offering plenty of seating set up like nature's bleachers over ridiculous views north and south of the Hudson River, down on the Bear Mountain Bridge, and across to Bear Mountain and Popolopen Torne. Keep an eye on children or dogs because it can be steep if you head down too far, but for the hike itself should be no problem for the whole family!

Community Photos

Always practice Leave No Trace ethics on your adventures and follow local regulations.

Nearby Lodging

From $140/night

Cooke’s Creek

Hopewell Junction, New York

From $140/night

Hopeland Rest

Hopewell Junction, New York

From $100/night

Tranquil Farm

Goshen, New York

Reviews

Leave a Review

Overall rating: 

Great Hike

A little tough when it has been raining as the stairs can be slippery. Be aware that if you’re going there by train that the Manitou station isn’t always stopped at and you need to walk along the highway for a while to reach the trail head.

Great Trail But....

Ascend was a little challenging but the view is so worth it! You start off on the white trail and then must continue on the blue in order to reach the top. Made the mistake of sticking with the white trail the whole time my first time hiking it and it wraps around the mountain in a circle so I never saw the view the first time!

Distance

2 Miles

Elevation Gain

790 Feet

Activities

Photography, Hiking

Skill

Beginner

Season

Spring, Summer, Autumn

Type

Out-and-Back

Added by

Shaun O'Neill

Nearby Adventures

Adventure

Hike Bald Mountain, Bear Mountain State Park

Adventure

Hike Popolopen Torne

Adventure

Hike the Camp Smith Trail

Adventure

Hike the Osborn Loop

More Nearby Adventures

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