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Snowshoe Mt. Seymour to Tim Jones Peak

North Vancouver, British Columbia

Details

Distance

5.6 miles

Elevation Gain

1607.6 ft

Route Type

Out-and-Back

Description

Added by Ashika Parsad

An easy to moderate snowshoe behind the Seymour ski hill with arguably the best views of the city. There are many vantages along the way, allowing you to make your trip as short or as long as you'd like.

You'll see traction of all sorts in the Mt. Seymour area during Winter months, including: yak tracks, microspikes, crampons, snowshoes, skis (with and without skins), and my personal favourite, the magic carpet.

The Mt. Seymour trail parallels the Seymour downhill ski area. It follows up and over Brockton Point which is your first source of breath-taking views (save your breath, there's a lot more where that view came from).

You'll continue up a steep-in-sections slope which is the marked 'winter route' for backcountry users - depending on the conditions, you may need snowshoes and/or crampons.

The trail continues on to First Pump (or First Peak). You'll have the option of making a side trip up First Pump, or dropping down the col and continuing to Tim Jones Peak.

There is one very steep ascent up a gully, just before you reach Tim Jones Peak.

From the summit, you'll see great views of Vancouver, the Fraser Valley, the Strait of Georgia, the North Shore mountains, and beyond.

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Features

Snowboarding
Photography
Skiing
Snowshoeing
Hiking
Dog Friendly
Easy Parking
Forest
Groups
Scenic

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Always practice Leave No Trace ethics on your adventures and follow local regulations. Please explore responsibly!

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