How to Balance New Adventures with Old Favorites

Andrew Todd

Both play important roles in a life lived outdoors.

As explorers and lovers of the outdoors, we often face a little dilemma. Should we aim for that new and exciting adventure opportunity or go relive an old favorite? Sometimes we have the time and resources to go backpack that new route, visit that new climbing location, or explore that never-before-seen place in the world. However, sometimes we end up on a beloved local trail or a very familiar mountaintop. 

I believe that both of these situations are equally valuable and both play a vital role in building this life lived outdoors. The following are my cases for why you should spring for that big new adventure if the time is right, but also why you should treasure your old favorites that keep you coming back time after time.

Go On That New Adventure

Having a new adventure means (to some extent) exploring the unknown, opening yourself up to the unexpected, and feeling the thrill of things you've never experienced before (probably in a place you've never seen before). Adventures like these will test you, stretch you, and challenge you, but they can also be awe-inspiring, create vivid memories and stories, and take you to new heights in your skills and knowledge. These experiences will grow you and open your eyes to this amazing planet in ways you'll never forget!


Revisit Your Old Favorites

Revisiting an old adventure is often about finding peace in the familiar places you know and love. Sometimes you just don't have the time, resources, or energy to jump into something new, and that's totally fine. Often going back to places that you already know are fun and relaxing will help "refill" your curiosity and love for the outdoors, and prepare you for future adventures. Never underestimate the rejuvenating power of the quick weekend trip or the local hike!

It's All About Balance

These cases or principles have worked really well for me. The balance that these two sides bring to life is why I created and then backpacked my own route through the Smoky Mountains earlier this year, but also why I am returning to Zion National Park for the second year in a row this fall. 

Some might say that life is too short to visit the same place twice, but I think that life is too short to fly through it without really taking anything in. Explore far and wide, but also be free to return to the places that really captured you from the first time you saw them.

Published: August 22, 2017

Andrew Todd

Web developer by weekday. Cyclist, hiker, and bookworm the rest of the time.

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